© pixabay
Advertisment

Five steps to a workforce with hybrid skills

“Pandemic” ways of working are increasingly becoming new standards. For management and workforce alike, this poses challenges that should not be underestimated.

More and more people are working from both home and the office. And that’s not going to change anytime soon after the coronavirus pandemic, as many employees want more flexible work models. And that’s despite the fact that, according to the 2020 Deloitte Flexible Working Study, nearly half of respondents miss having a clear separation between their work and private life when working from home.

At least for HR managers in Germany, the future seems certain in this regard: According to the labor market report by personnel service provider Robert Half, the majority of respondents (86 percent) see hybrid working teams as a permanent feature of the working world. But the demands facing employees are also correspondingly “hybrid”. For example, the importance of communication skills in many positions is more important than ever.

New skills in the crisis

Hybrid skill sets have been in demand for some time but the pandemic has shifted the priorities for many companies. For example, in the first half of 2021, managing costs (50 percent), identifying new growth strategies (49 percent) and investing in new technologies (45 percent) were at the top of the agenda. This ranking is also reflected in the job descriptions and the skills they require.

However, it is not advisable to immediately rush into recruiting. According to the experts at personnel service provider Robert Half, it is preferable to have a more structured, five-step approach to build a qualified and versatile workforce:

  1. Evaluate business goals and priorities: It must be clear where the journey is headed in order to hire the right team. What’s ahead and what will it require in terms of skills, technologies, infrastructure and budget? This is a fundamental step, especially for digital transformation projects.
  2. Identify skills gaps: Perform an audit to evaluate existing skills and upcoming duties. Use hypothetical scenarios to evaluate key skills such as flexibility and agility, creative thinking and the emotional intelligence of your employees. In addition, you should review existing positions to identify overlapping qualifications. This will help you clearly define roles and make them more efficient.
  3. Plan your HR strategy: Based on the skills audit, you can determine which positions and which skills are needed now and in the long term.
  4. Consider external support: Not all skills that are urgently required in the near term will be needed in the company permanently. You may be able to close current skills gaps with temporary staff such as interim managers or even keep entire areas more cost-efficient through managed service solutions.
  5. Introduce reskilling: Many workers have acquired new, hybrid skills during the pandemic. The concept of lifelong learning is not new in the workplace, but it has become much more relevant with recent disruptive developments. Anchor it firmly in your corporate culture and actively promote the professional development of your employees. In doing so, you will not only position yourself for the future but also boost employee retention.

Advertisment
Advertisment
Advertisment
Advertisment
Advertisment